Hotel

Hotel Ritz Paris France

Hotel Ritz Paris France

A hotel is an establishment that provides lodging paid on a short-term basis. The provision of basic accommodation, in times past, consisting only of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand has largely been replaced by rooms with modern facilities, including en-suite bathrooms and air conditioning or climate control. Additional common features found in hotel rooms are a telephone, an alarm clock, a television, a safe, a mini-bar with snack foods and drinks, and facilities for making tea and coffee. Luxury features include bathrobes and slippers, a pillow menu, twin-sink vanities, and jacuzzi bathtubs. Larger hotels may provide additional guest facilities such as a swimming pool, fitness center, business center, childcare, conference facilities and social function services.

Hotel rooms are usually numbered (or named in some smaller hotels and B&Bs) to allow guests to identify their room. Some hotels offer meals as part of a room and board arrangement. In the United Kingdom, a hotel is required by law to serve food and drinks to all guests within certain stated hours. In Japan, capsule hotels provide a minimized amount of room space and shared facilities.

Etymology

The word hotel is derived from the French hôtel (coming from hôte meaning host), which referred to a French version of a townhouse or any other building seeing frequent visitors, rather than a place offering accommodation. In contemporary French usage, hôtel now has the same meaning as the English term, and hôtel particulier is used for the old meaning. The French spelling, with the circumflex, was also used in English, but is now rare. The circumflex replaces the ‘s’ found in the earlier hostel spelling, which over time took on a new, but closely related meaning. Grammatically, hotels usually take the definite article – hence “The Astoria Hotel” or simply “The Astoria.”

Types

Hotel operations vary in size, function, and cost. Most hotels and major hospitality companies that operate hotels have set widely accepted industry standards to classify hotel types. General categories include the following;
• Conference hotels and resort hotels often contain full-sized luxury facilities with full service accommodations and amenities.
• Examples may include: Conrad Hotels, InterContinental Hotels, Ritz-Carlton, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts, Dorchester Collection, JW Marriott Hotels, Starwood – Westin Hotels, Hilton, Marriott, and Hyatt
• Historic Inns and boutique hotels often contain luxury facilities of varying size in unique or intimate settings with full service accommodations.
• Select Service
• Examples may include: Holiday Inn, Courtyard by Marriott and Hilton Garden Inn
• Limited Service
• Examples may include: Hampton Inn, aloft, Holiday Inn Express, Fairfield Inn, Four Points by Sheraton, and Days Inn
• Extended Stay
• Examples may include: Staybridge Suites, Homewood Suites by Hilton, Residence Inn by Marriott, element, and Extended Stay Hotels
• Timeshare
• Examples may include: Hilton Grand Vacations, Marriott Vacation Club International, Westgate Resorts, Starwood Vacation Ownership, and Disney Vacation Club
• Destination Club
• Botels – floating hotels.

Hotel Management

Hotel management is a globally accepted career field and academic field of study. Degree programs such as hospitality management studies, a business degree, and/or certification programs formally prepare hotel managers for industry practice.
Most hotel establishments consist of a General Manager who serves as the head executive (often referred to as the “Hotel Manager”), department heads who oversee various departments within the hotel, middle managers, administrative staff, and line-level supervisors. The organizational chart and quantity of job positions varies by hotel size, function, and is often determined by hotel ownership.

Hotel from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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